Document type: DU ETD
Collection: Geology Theses  
 
Title Spatial Variations in the Commission of Serious Class I Crimes in Denver for 1977
Author(s) Duru, Titus Udunna
School/Department Department of Geography
Institution University of Denver
Degree Type Master's
Degree Name M.A.
Type of Resource text
Degree Date 1979 December
Digital Origin reformatted digital
Rights Statement All Rights Reserved
Reason for Restrictions No restrictions
Type of Restriction No restrictions
Keyword(s) Geography
Geology
Genre Dissertations, Academic
Abstract This study proposed to determine if there were any spatial variations in the occurrence pattern of serious Class I crimes in the city of Denver for 1977 and, if so, how geographic and socioeconomic variables related to these spatial variations. The research method and design developed hypotheses that were aimed at determining if: (1) the five serious Class I crimes of homicide, robbery, rape, aggravated assault, and burglary have similar geographic patterns; (2) the Commission rate of serious Class I crimes Varies with direction from the Central Business District; (3) high rates of serious Class I crimes are inversely related to distance from Denver;s Central Business District; (4) high rates of serious Class I crimes are inversely related to median family income; (5) high rates of serious Class I crimes are positively related to the percentage of families living in multiple family units; and (6) high rates of serious Class I crimes are positively related to the percentage of school-age children. Hypothesis 1 was investigated using computer mapping techniques and correlation analysis to test for spatial similarities in the patterns of the five serious Class I crimes for the city of Denver. Hypothesis 2 was tested using analysis of variance to determine if there were significant variations in crime rates with direction from the Central Business District. Hypothesis 3 through 6 were tested utilizing correlation analysis. Findings indicate that the five serious Class I crimes display similarities in their patterns of occurrence. It was also found that variations existed in the different quadrants of the city with respect to direction from the Central Business District. (The northeast quadrant had the highest crime rates.) Both median family income and distance from the Central Business District were statistically significant in the analysis as opposed to the percentage of school-age children and multiple dwelling units. In conclusion, the five serious Class I crimes displayed similarities in their patterns of occurrence which justified grouping them together to form a composite crime index for further analysis. Median family income and distance from the Central Business District contributed in accounting for high crime rates and their spatial variations in Denver for 1977. Youthfulness of population and multiple family units, at least as measured in this study, did not make any significant contribution to the understanding of high crime rates and their spatial variations.
Handle http://hdl.handle.net/10176/codu:55714
 
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Created: Mon, 11 Oct 2010, 13:53:59 UTC by John Adams . Detailed History