Document type: DU ETD
Collection: Geology Theses  
 
Title An Evaluation of Spatial Forecasting Techniques Used in Tactical Crime Analysis
Author(s) Van Auken, John B.
School/Department Department of Geography
Institution University of Denver
Degree Type Master's
Degree Name M.A.
Type of Resource text
Degree Date 06/2005
Digital Origin reformatted digital
Rights Statement All Rights Reserved
Reason for Restrictions No restrictions
Type of Restriction No restrictions
Keyword(s) Geography
Geology
Genre Dissertations, Academic
Abstract Spatial forecasting is used in tactical crime analysis to "predict" the area of a future event in a crime series. This allows law enforcement to take a proactive approach to criminal activity instead of a reactive approach. The concept has received recent publicity and scrutiny as a valuable new option in law enforcement due to various successes across the country. A survey of the crime analysis community on the use of spatial forecasting techniques was conducted to determine the most popular techniques in use today. The Minimum Convex Polygon, 68% and 95% Standard Deviation Rectangles, 50% and 90% Jennrich-Turner Ellipses, and Kernel Smoothing based on Spider Distance Analysis were determined to be the more prevalent techniques. These methods were looked at in depth for their ability to "forecast" the area within which the next event in a crime series will occur by evaluating them on thirty-one solved crime series. The series were collected from various analysts across the country, have a varying number of events and geographic distribution, and are of different crime types. The techniques were evaluated on the number of correct predictions and size of forecasted areas. The history and evolution of these techniques towards use in crime analysis is discussed, along with the possibilities for future research.
Handle http://hdl.handle.net/10176/codu:55688
 
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Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
Van_Auken_Spatial_Forecasting.pdf   Van_Auken_Spatial_Forecasting.pdf application/pdf 5.92MB 0

 
 
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Created: Mon, 20 Sep 2010, 11:04:43 UTC by Emily Susanin . Detailed History